Repository Spotlight: Pacific Tsunami Museum in Hilo

AHA is pleased to introduce you to another repository featured in the 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawai’i.  This month’s pick is the Pacific Tsunami Museum Archives.

The Pacific Tsunami Museum is located on the corner of Kamehameha Ave. and Kalakaua St in downtown Hilo.  The building, built by First Hawaiian Bank in 1930, was designed by the late C.W. Dickey, Hawaiꞌi’s most prominent architect of the early 20th century.

The Pacific Tsunami Museum is located on the corner of Kamehameha Ave. and Kalakaua St in downtown Hilo. The building, built for First Hawaiian Bank in 1930, was designed by the late C.W. Dickey, Hawaiꞌi’s most prominent architect of the early 20th century.

Hawai’i has a long history with tsunamis, which remain an ever-present threat to the islands.  The Pacific Tsunami Museum (PTM) is a community-based, non-profit organization that provides tsunami education programs to residents and visitors to the State.  The PTM Archives houses one of the world’s most extensive collections of tsunami photographs, maps, oral histories, scientific papers, documents, videos, and artifacts, many of which are on display within museum exhibits.  PTM archive materials are used in programming to promote tsunami understanding.  The Museum shares the stories of communities that have risen up after tragedy and survivor voices that impart a warning for others with lessons learned.

Caption:   The book Hawai’i Tsunamis includes images and survivor stories primarily from the 1946 and 1960 tsunamis, but also includes the 1950’s, 1975, 2010, 2011, and 2012 tsunamis.  Some of the images in the book are seen in print for the first time, from collections recently acquired.  Men running from the huge third wave in downtown Hilo in 1946. PTM Yasuki Arakaki Collection. Cecilio Licos, photographer.

“Hawai’i Tsunamis” in the newest book produced by the PTM and includes images and survivor stories from several tsunami events; some of the images in the book are seen in print for the first time.

 

The Archives has an extensive collection of historic images, which include photographs depicting the aftermath of tsunamis and advancing tsunami waves and historic images of Hawai’i, particularly of Hilo town.  Exciting new photograph collections in the archive include aerial photographs taken after the 1946 tsunami and also high resolution color images taken after the 1960 tsunami.  Some of the new images were recently published in the book Hawai’i Tsunamis, authored by PTM Archivist/Curator, Barbara Muffler.

“My dad says that if we are going to die, we hold each other hands so they can find everybody together.”  – Bertram Kinoshita

Perhaps the most important collection is the oral histories, emulating a “living archive”.  The oral history collection includes over 600 first-hand accounts, from tsunami survivors and witnesses, in video and written format.

“Faces began to appear at the windows of buildings damaged so heavily that any life in them seemed impossible.”  -A.E.P. Wall

Kazu Murakami, 15-years old at the time, had been washed out to sea at Laupahoehoe during the 1946 tsunami.  He drifted overnight and was rescued the next day by David Cook and brought aboard the Naval ship LST 731.

Kazu had been washed out to sea at Laupahoehoe during the 1946 tsunami. He drifted overnight and was rescued the next day by Naval ship LST 731. Photo from PTM Archives.

One of my favorite stories starts with a photograph (right) donated to the archive that showed a man hanging on the side of a Naval ship rescuing a boy that had been washed out to sea during the 1946 tsunami.  The identity of the boy and the rescuer were unknown at the time… but then two random visits to the Museum within eight days of each other connected the families of both men to the photograph.  Years later, the PTM brought the men, David Cook and Kazu Murakami, together for a “surprise reunion” at the Museum and to share their amazing stories.  

Kazu was 15 years old at the time and had spent the day and night drifting at sea.  He was taken to the military hospital after his rescue; however, he was not identified by his family, even thought they had searched for him there, because his sunburned condition had made him unrecognizable.  When he was discharged, Kazu took a bus home where he found family members planning his funeral.

Tsunamis have played a significant role in determining where people live and work in the Hawaiian Islands.  With hundreds of lives lost and extensive damages, the Big Island areas of Hilo and Laupahoehoe have been heavily impacted by tsunami events; but the disasters also brought countless stories of survival and heroism.  Out of these tragedies, families relocated into new homes, beautiful open spaces and parks were developed in waterfront areas, and the warning system improved to allow more assurances to the community during future events.  The PTM stands as a living memorial to those who lost their lives in past tsunamis and those that reshaped their communities out of these tragedies.

“The city’s spirit was one of rebuilding, with greater safety precautions than ever before, confident that out of the rubble would come a more beautiful and more productive community.” -A.E.P. Wall

If you have any questions about the Archive, please contact the PTM Archivist at (808) 935-0926 or email at tsunami@tsunami.org.

Jill Sommer

 

Repository Spotlight: ꞌUluꞌulu: The Henry Kuꞌualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawaiꞌi

In honor of the approaching Hawaii International Film Festival (HIFF), which begins October 30th, this month’s repository spotlight shines on ꞌUluꞌulu: The Henry Kuꞌualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawaiꞌi.

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A work in progress, the archive’s 11,000 square feet will eventually contain an exhibition space, screening area, and computer terminals where individuals can view entire collections of digitized materials. This is in addition to restoring, preserving, cataloging, and digitizing moving images that are the heart of the archive.

ꞌUluꞌulu, located in the UH West Oahu campus Library, is the official state archive for moving images and is dedicated to the care, preservation, and digitization of film and videotape related to the history and culture of Hawai‘i.  There are currently over 17,000 videotapes, 250 motion picture film reels, and 300 hours of digitized footage in the archives’ collections.

ꞌUluꞌulu fights against time to capture moments on film and tape that are disappearing due to the deterioration of materials and obsolescence of devices that can play them.

ꞌUluꞌulu will be showcasing a newly preserved and digitized film from their collection and project it on the big screen as part of HIFF’s Made in Hawaii program.  This year ꞌUluꞌulu will be screening TWO documentary films from the Friends of ꞌIolani Palace collection:

  • ꞌIolani Palace: Hawaii’s Past Today (1968)

  • ꞌIolani Palace Restoration (circa 1970)

Both documentary films were directed by local filmmaker George Tahara and document the decade-long restoration of the Palace from 1969-1979.  These were recently digitized along with 47 other films from the Friends of ‘Iolani Palace collection at ‘Ulu‘ulu.  The archival prints are 16mm motion picture film reels.  ꞌUluꞌulu worked with a preservation lab to create digital preservation master and access files of all 49 reels.

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The footage includes scenes of the Palace interior and exterior pre-restoration. The Palace restoration footage includes scenes during the restoration process: artists and craftsmen repairing and refurbishing original doorways, chandeliers, staircases, floors and glass plate windows.

ꞌUluꞌulu’s Archival Film Screening Night at the Hawaii International Film Festival is happening on Saturday, November 8th, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. at the Dole Cannery Theatre… And it’s FREE!!!

The premiers of the digitized ‘IOLANI PALACE : HAWAII’S PAST TODAY and ‘IOLANI PALACE RESTORATION will be followed by a panel discussion about the technical aspects of film archiving and preservation, the history of the Palace restoration, and the importance of ‘Iolani Palace as the center of social and political life for the Kingdom of Hawai‘i and for today.  We hope to see you there!

HIFF2014_Uluulu

For more information on ꞌUluꞌulu and other repositories, visit AHA’s 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawai‘i.

Repository Spotlight: Lyman Museum & Mission House in Hilo, Hawai’i

AHA is pleased to introduce you to another repository featured in the 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawai’i.  This month’s pick is the Lyman Museum Archives.   Lyman Archives includes historical documents, books, maps, ephemera, and photographic collections.

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Lyman Museum Archivist, Miki Bulos, shared details of the current JOHN HOWARD PIERCE PHOTO IDENTIFICATION PROJECT:

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John Howard Pierce, Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives

The Pierce Photo Identification Project is an effort currently underway in the Lyman Museum Archives to identify the tens of thousands of photographs in the Pierce Collection.

Pierce, a former Hawaii Tribune-Herald reporter and Lyman Museum curator, was an avid photographer who meticulously documented his beloved home of Hawai‘i Island in the mid-twentieth century, a pivotal period defined and galvanized by the admission of Hawai‘i into the United States in 1959.

 

 

The collection contains Pierce’s surviving body of work—an estimated 50,000 photographic prints and negatives, the bulk of which are from the late 1950s through the early 1970s.  The collection’s significance lies in the years covered and the variety of subjects captured. As the archives processes the collection, what becomes evident is that during a historically important period of tremendous growth and change—those years around statehood—Pierce and his camera bore witness to nearly all forms of community activity conducted on Hawai’i Island.

Moke

Lehua Kamalamalama and her Rosettes welcoming the SS Monterey on maiden voyage, Port of Hilo, October 1961. Modern day Theresa Sharon Moke Becktel and Sandra Moke Lee, pictured in the front, were identified through the Pierce Photo ID Project and pose next to their old photo. Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives.

It is this expansive and comprehensive view of Hawai‘i Island that makes the collection not only an invaluable contribution to the community’s story, but an invaluable contribution to the state’s historical record. They provide a view to the recent past, revealing a community ambitiously growing, changing, and constructing a new future; remembering and reclaiming its traditions; and savoring the simple pleasures of everyday life.

Lovey Barbara

Welcoming the USS Walker bearing gift of fifty-star flag, Port of Hilo, July 1958. Benny Kahaka (musician on far left) and Lovey Mae Akamu Scott (center) were identified through the Pierce Photo ID Project. Scott poses next to her photo along with Kahaka’s daughter, Barbara Lake. Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives.

Unfortunately, almost none of the photos in the collection have any information beyond date, if that.  The Photo ID Project is a multi-pronged strategy to recruit community help to solve these mysteries.  The recent Pierce Photograph Exhibit was a result of this project—over fifty identified photos were on display.

Unidentified photos have been shared with the public via Hawaii Tribune-Herald and the Kama‘aina Shopper, the Pierce photo exhibit, the Lyman Museum website, museum-hosted Photo ID Days and community outreach.  Of the almost 800 photos made available to the public, approximately 450 have been identified (at least partially).

Kodani

Paul Kodani poses next to his photo. Kodani was identified through the Pierce Photo ID Project as the boy paddling in a homemade canoe, Wailoa Estuary, late 1950s. Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives.

Visit Lyman Museum on-line to see if you can identify some photos and to learn of additional Research Collections.  The Pierce photo exhibit will soon be available on-line!

AHA and SAA to co-host digital archives workshops

The Association of Hawai‘i Archivists and the Society of American Archivists, with the support of UH Mānoa’s Hamilton Library, are pleased to present 4 full-day workshops on topics relating to digital archives. These courses, taught by experts in the field of digital archives, are designed to provide you with the knowledge and tools you need to manage the demands of born-digital records. These courses are usually only offered on the U.S. continent, so we encourage you to take advantage of this great (and close-to-home) professional development opportunity!

All workshops will be held in Hamilton Library’s room 306 (in the main building). Early-bird and regular registration cost for SAA members is $199/$269 per workshop. For non-members, it is $259/$319 per workshop.

Sign up for any or all of the workshops via the links below.

 

Preserving Digital Archives

Monday, October 6, 2014, 9 am to 5 pm

Instructor: Liz Bishoff

Early-bird deadline: September 6, 2014

 

Managing Electronic Records in Archives and Special Collections

Friday, October 10, 2014, 9 am to 5 pm

Instructor: Seth Shaw

Early-bird deadline: September 10, 2014

 

Arrangement and Description of Electronic Records part I

Monday, March 30, 2015, 9 am to 5 pm

Instructor: Dr. Christopher J. Prom

Early-bird deadline: March 1, 2015

 

Arrangement and Description of Electronic Records part II

Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 9 am to 5 pm

Instructor: Dr. Christopher J. Prom

Early-bird deadline: March 1, 2015

Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawaii – 5th Edition Preview

The AHA Board and the Directory Committee are pleased to present a sneak preview of the new 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Repositories in Hawaii!

Download a PDF here

Last revised by AHA and the Hawaiian Historical Society in 1999, the Directory is an invaluable resource for researchers and scholars of Hawaii’s history with listings that include the holdings, locations, contact information and websites of repositories with collections open to the public.

This is a still a work in progress and some listings may be incomplete or pending revision. Please contact the Directory Committee (Janel, Mary Louise, or Barbara) if you’d like to add or edit information in your listing.

Mahalo to everyone who submitted updates to your listing and welcome to the 13 new repositories added to the Directory!

AHA Conference Registration Deadline Extended

The registration deadline for the AHA Practical Stewardship of Collections Conference has been extended to next Friday, January 18, 2013. The registration form and detailed program information may be found here:

2013 AHA Practical Stewardship conference registration form

Thanks so much, and see you in February!