2015 Annual Meeting Spotlight- Hawaiʻi, Moku O Keawe

Hawaiʻi, Moku O Keawe

By Malia Morales

It’s not easy for busy professionals to be able to travel to a neighbor island for an entire weekend of professional development, but the 2015 AHA Annual meeting was certainly worth every moment (and dollar) spent on Hawaiʻi Island.  From beginning to end, the daily agendas were very thoughtfully planned, well coordinated, and cheerfully managed.  The learning opportunities abounded, not just because of the many significant cultural sites selected for visits, but also because of the wonderful librarians, archivists, cultural resources, and eager students in attendance.  The collective knowledge and experience of the 35 attendees was impressive and an experience unto itself.

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Photo by Malia Morales

Upon arrival at the Kona airport, folks gathered and greeted each other with smiling faces and open arms.  Our diligent planning team had already skillfully mapped out all of the travel routes, checked the weather, traffic (yes, there was traffic in Kona, unfortunately due to a terrible accident), saw to our transportation, and quickly had us excitedly on our way to our first destination, the Kona Historical Society.  Though we were in traffic, we had plenty of time to admire the stunning scenery and enjoy lovely conversations with friends, both old and new.

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Photo by Malia Morales

The group was treated to pastries and beverages at our first destination and also had time to sit and talk before being introduced to the history of the site.  Our hosts shared about a specially created experience for the group, which was to include some time in the library and archive as well as being participant observers in a shopping experience at the general store, which would have been typical to the period of the areas’ earlier inhabitants.  We then continued to the Kona Coffee Living History Farm for an introduction to the site, the mission and activities of the managing group, and self-tours of one of the farm’s historical Japanese family living areas, coffee roasting facilities, and key fruit plant setups.  The group enjoyed an ʻono bento lunch and a variety of refreshing drinks, including 100% Kona coffee from the farm!

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Photo by Malia Morales

Our next visit was to Huliheʻe Palace. Known to have been a home of Princess Ruth Keʻelikolani as well as other Hawaiian aliʻi, the grounds and building are full of historical items and incredibly interesting stories.

After checking into our rooms at the Kamuela Inn and freshening up, we went to Parker Ranch’s Pukalani Stables, where the group was given private access to the Paniolo Heritage Center.  Viewing all of the pieces of paniolo history, and reading through the many histories of Parker Ranch cowboys and cowgirls, set the stage for our evening speaker, Dr. Billy Bergin, longtime Parker Ranch veterinarian and cowboy.  Following an excellent buffet dinner in the private dining area, and an incredibly informational talk by Dr. Bergin, the group returned to the Inn to rest and reflect on a busy, but lovely, day.

 

All welcomed the following Kamuela morning in different ways. Some slept-in a bit and enjoyed muffins and coffee at the Inn, others were up early to explore the town on foot and try some recommended local breakfast spots. Before we knew it though, we were checked out and on our way to Honokaʻa to visit the North Hawaiʻi Education and Research Center (NHERC), to be hosted by Dr. Momi Naughton, and have our 2015 Annual Meeting and lunch. Dr. Naughton pulled several fascinating items from the collection and shared stories about each item that captivated us all. Every moment there was much appreciated!

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Photo by Malia Morales

The close of our second and final day was spent at Puʻukoholā heiau and the Kīholo Bay Scenic Overlook.  AHA’s own Kepā Maly and Helen Wong-Smith shared information about Puʻukoholā, an extremely significant Hawaiian cultural site, as well as the development of and access to an informational database about the site.  Mahalo NUI to them both for all the valuable information shared!

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Photo by Malia Morales

The return home after a weekend full of such great fellowship and sharing of valuable information was a bit sad in that we all had to part ways.  But it was also very exciting to know that we were now much more fortified with knowledge, experience, and an expanded personal network to better represent our organizations and serve our users.  Mahalo piha to each member of the planning committee for a phenomenal job done in coordinating this year’s Annual meeting!

More of Malia’s photos can be viewed on Flickr!

Repository Spotlight: Lahaina Restoration Foundation

Happy New Year!

This month, our featured repository is the Lahaina Restoration Foundation.  Founded in West Maui in 1962, the Lahaina Restoration Foundation (LRF) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the restoration, preservation and interpretation of Lahaina’s physical and cultural legacy.  It manages several important historic sites on Maui including:

  • Baldwin Home Museum – the oldest house still standing on Maui, built by missionary Reverend Ephraim Spaulding
  • Hale Pa‘i Printing Museum – the home of the Ramage press used to print the first newspaper west of the Rockies
  • Lahaina Heritage Museum – the Old Courthouse turned exhibit space, offering a comprehensive, interactive look at the rich and varied history of Hawaii’s first capital
  • Pioneer Mill Smokestack & Locomotives Exhibit – a place for visitors to learn the history of the sugar industry in Lahaina
  • Wo Hing Museum – the home of the Wo Hing Society, highlighting the rich history of Lahaina’s earliest Chinese immigrants and their many contributions to the Maui community.

LRF also oversees the maintenance and operations of several other historic buildings, parks and walking trails throughout West Maui.  You can read more about these individual sites here:  http://lahainarestoration.org/historic-sites/

Lahaina Heritage Museum.  Photo courtesy of the Lahaina Restoration Foundation.

Lahaina Heritage Museum. Photo courtesy of the Lahaina Restoration Foundation.

According to their website, LRF maintains several collections of artifacts, photographs, manuscripts, maps, logs and other materials representative of Lahaina’s colorful past. These collections are available to the public and researchers by request.  They are also used in displays assembled by LRF Director of Museums & Events, Arrianna D’Orsay, who is responsible for cleaning, conserving and reorganizing their treasures, all according to archival standards.  The most recent LRF newsletter described some of the treasures that D’Orsay has unveiled including a camera from the 1890s that was used by the Baldwin Family to help document Lahaina.  Chinese wedding chests featuring handpainted scenes of life in China were also recently cleaned and conserved for the Wo Hing Museum.

Watercolor of Hale Pa‘i.  Photo courtesy of the Lahaina Restoration Foundation.

Watercolor of Hale Pa‘i. Photo courtesy of the Lahaina Restoration Foundation.

In addition to exhibits, the LRF hosts several events to bring the community together in celebration of their heritage.  One popular event is the annual ‘Lahaina Plantation Days’, a multi-day affair which looks back at fond memories of sugar and pineapple plantation life through lively displays, nostalgic games for kids, and cultural demonstrations.   Their most recent event paid tribute to the many jobs that were done on the plantation and featured a display of old Pioneer Mill Company newsletters, field equipment, anecdotes from workers’ families, and other intriguing objects from their collections.

Looking forward, D’Orsay says that they will focus on creating a climate controlled archive for their collections, and building a digital archival database.  The future looks bright for the Lahaina Restoration Foundation and we look forward to hearing more about their achievements.

If you’d like to read more about LRF and become a friend, you may do so here:  http://lahainarestoration.org/friendship/

Repository Spotlight: Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (SS.CC) United States Province Archives

On November 15, Stuart Ching, Provincial Archivist for the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary (SS.CC.) United States Province Archives, treated AHA members to a tour of the new archives facility at St. Patrick Monastery in Kaimukī.

Provincial Archivist Stuart Ching reads excerpts from a journal chronicling the activities of Sacred Hearts missionaries to Hawai`i.

Provincial Archivist Stuart Ching reads excerpts from a journal chronicling the activities of Sacred Hearts missionaries to Hawai`i.

The Congregation of the Sacred Hearts, a Roman Catholic religious community, was founded in Poitiers, France, in 1800. After establishing schools and parishes throughout France, the male branch of the Congregation embarked on its first foreign mission to the Hawaiian Islands in 1827. Over the next hundred years, the Congregation established churches across the islands, including the Cathedral of Our Lady Peace in downtown Honolulu, Saint Joseph Church in Hilo, and Maria Lanakila Church in Lahaina.

The SS.CC. U.S. Province Archives was established in 2011, when the USA East Province and the Hawai‘i Province of the Congregation were combined. Because Hawai‘i was the older province, it was decided that the archives would be centralized here. In May 2014, the collections of the Hawai‘i Province Archives were moved from Kāne‘ohe to St. Patrick Monastery, where they were combined with boxes of records from the USA East Province. The St. Patrick archives facility, located in retrofitted monastery dormitories, features a climate-controlled processing area, reading room, and storage vault with compact shelving and custom-made light-blocking shades.

Boxes of records entering the provincial archives are frozen at -10 degrees Fahrenheit for three weeks to kill pests and their larvae.

Boxes of records entering the provincial archives are frozen at -10 degrees Fahrenheit for three weeks to kill pests and their larvae.

The collection, which dates from 1825, contains correspondence, photographs and photo albums, scrapbooks, publications, seminary records, journals, plans, chalices, memorabilia, and even relics. It includes material in Hawaiian, Portuguese, English, French, Latin, Italian, and Dutch. Among the collection highlights are carpentry tools, vestments, and other personal objects of Saint Damien De Veuster; journals of early Sacred Hearts missionaries; photographic images of Catholic churches and communities throughout Hawai‘i; early twentieth-century glass plate negatives documenting people and life at the Kalaupapa Settlement on Moloka‘i; and nineteenth-century Catholic Mission Press publications in the Hawaiian language.

Stuart shows us Saint Damien De Veuster’s walking stick, which was made from a guava branch.

Stuart shows us Saint Damien De Veuster’s walking stick, which was made from a guava branch.

The Sacred Hearts U.S. Province Archives is taking measured steps to preserve and access its historical collections. Its goal is to transform itself from a closed-off private repository to a valuable community resource. Scholars and members of the general public are welcome to view the collections by scheduling an appointment with the provincial archivist.

Repository Spotlight: ꞌUluꞌulu: The Henry Kuꞌualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawaiꞌi

In honor of the approaching Hawaii International Film Festival (HIFF), which begins October 30th, this month’s repository spotlight shines on ꞌUluꞌulu: The Henry Kuꞌualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawaiꞌi.

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A work in progress, the archive’s 11,000 square feet will eventually contain an exhibition space, screening area, and computer terminals where individuals can view entire collections of digitized materials. This is in addition to restoring, preserving, cataloging, and digitizing moving images that are the heart of the archive.

ꞌUluꞌulu, located in the UH West Oahu campus Library, is the official state archive for moving images and is dedicated to the care, preservation, and digitization of film and videotape related to the history and culture of Hawai‘i.  There are currently over 17,000 videotapes, 250 motion picture film reels, and 300 hours of digitized footage in the archives’ collections.

ꞌUluꞌulu fights against time to capture moments on film and tape that are disappearing due to the deterioration of materials and obsolescence of devices that can play them.

ꞌUluꞌulu will be showcasing a newly preserved and digitized film from their collection and project it on the big screen as part of HIFF’s Made in Hawaii program.  This year ꞌUluꞌulu will be screening TWO documentary films from the Friends of ꞌIolani Palace collection:

  • ꞌIolani Palace: Hawaii’s Past Today (1968)

  • ꞌIolani Palace Restoration (circa 1970)

Both documentary films were directed by local filmmaker George Tahara and document the decade-long restoration of the Palace from 1969-1979.  These were recently digitized along with 47 other films from the Friends of ‘Iolani Palace collection at ‘Ulu‘ulu.  The archival prints are 16mm motion picture film reels.  ꞌUluꞌulu worked with a preservation lab to create digital preservation master and access files of all 49 reels.

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The footage includes scenes of the Palace interior and exterior pre-restoration. The Palace restoration footage includes scenes during the restoration process: artists and craftsmen repairing and refurbishing original doorways, chandeliers, staircases, floors and glass plate windows.

ꞌUluꞌulu’s Archival Film Screening Night at the Hawaii International Film Festival is happening on Saturday, November 8th, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. at the Dole Cannery Theatre… And it’s FREE!!!

The premiers of the digitized ‘IOLANI PALACE : HAWAII’S PAST TODAY and ‘IOLANI PALACE RESTORATION will be followed by a panel discussion about the technical aspects of film archiving and preservation, the history of the Palace restoration, and the importance of ‘Iolani Palace as the center of social and political life for the Kingdom of Hawai‘i and for today.  We hope to see you there!

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For more information on ꞌUluꞌulu and other repositories, visit AHA’s 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawai‘i.

Repository Spotlight: Filipino Digital Archives and History Center of Hawaii

Chief Master Leslie (right) Largo and Grand Master Gary (center) Largo practice with student at General Ablen School of Derobio Escrima in Kalihi.

Hmmmmm, you think to yourself.  Who are these people?  What are they doing?  Where can I can get one of those cheerful yellow shirts?

Yes folks, it’s time to spotlight another very special entry from AHA’s 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawai‘i.  This month, let’s take a look at eFil, the Filipino Digital Archives and History Center of Hawaii, where we’ll find all of the answers to the questions above.  Well, most of them.  We’re not sure where they got those lovely shirts.

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According to their website,  “eFIL’s mission is to help set the conditions and provide the necessary building blocks for students, educators, researchers and general public to develop an awareness and appreciation of Filipinos in Hawaii’s history.”  They focus specifically on Hawaii’s filipino community because of its geographic isolation, as well as its pivotal role in a people’s migration from the Philippine archipelago to the rest of the world.

With this mission in mind, eFil has collected oral histories from community members, digitized Filipino newspapers printed in Hawaii, preserved the musical stylings of the Julian Yorong Rondalla Group, digitized the WWI service records of Filipino veterans available online….and much, much more.

Richard Bustillo (center) presents United States Martial Arts Hall of Fame awards recognizing eFIL administrator Clement Bautista (left) and General Ablen School of Derobio Escrima Senior Master Carlton Kramer (right) for their efforts to document Hawaii's past and present masters of eskrima.

Richard Bustillo (center) presents United States Martial Arts Hall of Fame awards recognizing eFIL administrator Clement Bautista (left) and General Ablen School of Derobio Escrima Senior Master Carlton Kramer (right) for their efforts to document Hawaii’s past and present masters of eskrima.

According to Clem Bautista, eFil administrator, one of their current projects includes the Hawaii Masters of Eskrima documentary project, which is funded in part by the Hawaii Council for the Humanities.  It is a video documentary of some of Hawaii’s past and present masters of the Filipino martial arts.

Maestros Donald Mendoza (right) and C.J. Tobosa (left) of Tobosa School of Kali Escrima practice sparring with a dagger at Halawa Gym.

Maestros Donald Mendoza (right) and C.J. Tobosa (left) of Tobosa School of Kali Escrima practice sparring with a dagger at Halawa Gym.

The centerpiece of the project are oral histories of present masters and recollections of their past masters.  These past masters include:  Raymond Tobosa, Braulio and Eddie Pedoy, Frank Mamalias, Snookie Sanchez and Floro Villabrille. Among the present masters to be interviewed are Donald Mendoza, Gary and Leslie Largo, Patrick Amantiad, Michael and Josephine Del Mar, Rudy Orlanda, and Richard Bulacan.  Scheduled to be released later this year, the documentary will also include demonstrations by 11 schools of Filipino martial arts.

Interested in exploring their collections? eFil is open 24/7 at www.efilarchives.org.

Repository Spotlight: Hula Preservation Society

For the month of August, we’re highlighting the Hula Preservation Society, a non-profit organization committed to collecting and preserving the stories and knowledge of hula elders and sharing them with the global hula community.

Photographs of hula elders that have contributed materials and shared manaʻo through oral history adorn the wall of the HPS archive.

Photographs of hula elders that have contributed materials and shared manaʻo through oral history adorn the wall of the HPS archive.

Auntie Nona Beamer & Maile Loo. Photo courtesy HPS.

Auntie Nona Beamer and Maile Loo. Photo courtesy HPS.

The Hula Preservation Society was founded in 2000 by renowned cultural educator and Kumu Hula Auntie Nona Beamer and her hanai daughter Maile Loo. They and other community members recognized a generation of senior hula practitioners that were rapidly dwindling. As a way to honor these remarkable people, preserve undocumented cultural knowledge, and share hula resources, HPS began filming their life stories and hula teachings.

Maile Loo conducts an oral history interview with Auntie Hilda Keanaʻaina & Uncle George Naope. Photo courtesy HPS.

Maile Loo conducts an oral history interview with Auntie Hilda Keanaʻaina and Uncle George Naope. Photo courtesy HPS.

Since its inception, HPS has conducted oral history interviews with over 80 hula elders. Through the years, many hula collections from these elders have been entrusted to them, including personal papers with song and choreography, albums, newspaper clippings, hula implements, scrapbooks, photographs, and other historical hula-related materials.

Nona Beamer Papers.

Nona Beamer Papers.

In addition to preserving hula resources and serving the research needs of the hula community, HPS presents hula-related programming across Hawai‘i and beyond. In October, HPS will travel to New York to debut The Hawaiian Room, a film that documents the entertainers and dancers who worked in the illustrious Hawaiian-themed revue, open from 1937 to 1966 in the Lexington Hotel in New York City. A group of original Hawaiian Room dancers will attend and perform at the premiere that will be held at the historic 92nd Street Y on Friday, October 10. Another showing of the film will be held on November 8 at the Doris Duke Theater as part of the ʻOiwi Film Festival.

In November, HPS will present the following 3-day series as part of the International Waikiki Hula Conference (individual tickets apart from conference registration are available):

November 7: Great Masters of the 20th Century: Includes digitized Umatic tape footage of some of the last public performances by some of Hawaii’s most renowned Kumu Hula, Musicians, and Hawaiian scholars

November 8: Hula Kii: Hawaiian Puppetry: Video from HPS’s archive and panel discussion with Uncle Calvin Hoe and Auntie Mauliola Cook

November 9: Tribute to Legendary Kumu Hula Iolani Luahine: Including archival footage and talk story session by some who studied under her.

AHA is very grateful to the Hula Preservation Society for hosting us on August 23!

Front row L-->R: Kauila Niheu, Dore Minatodani, Kealani Makaiwi, Maile Loo, Ruth Horie, Carol Hasegawa; Second row L-->R: Keau George, Dawn Sueoka, Jill Sommer, Kapenaakala Shim, Annemarie Aweau, Margaret McAleavey, Gina Vergara-Bautista, Malia Van Heukelem, and Celeste Ohta. Photo courtesy HPS.

Front row, left to right: Kauila Niheu, Dore Minatodani, Kealani Makaiwi, Maile Loo, Ruth Horie, Carol Hasegawa; Second row, left to right: Keau George, Dawn Sueoka, Jill Sommer, Kapenaakala Shim, Annemarie Aweau, Margaret McAleavey, Gina Vergara-Bautista, Malia Van Heukelem, and Celeste Ohta. Photo courtesy HPS.

Hula Preservation Society

P.O. Box 6274 Kāneʻohe, HI 96744

(808) 247-9440

admin@hulapreservation.org

www.hulapreservation.org

Repository Spotlight: Lyman Museum & Mission House in Hilo, Hawai’i

AHA is pleased to introduce you to another repository featured in the 5th Edition of the Directory of Historical Records Repositories in Hawai’i.  This month’s pick is the Lyman Museum Archives.   Lyman Archives includes historical documents, books, maps, ephemera, and photographic collections.

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Lyman Museum Archivist, Miki Bulos, shared details of the current JOHN HOWARD PIERCE PHOTO IDENTIFICATION PROJECT:

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John Howard Pierce, Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives

The Pierce Photo Identification Project is an effort currently underway in the Lyman Museum Archives to identify the tens of thousands of photographs in the Pierce Collection.

Pierce, a former Hawaii Tribune-Herald reporter and Lyman Museum curator, was an avid photographer who meticulously documented his beloved home of Hawai‘i Island in the mid-twentieth century, a pivotal period defined and galvanized by the admission of Hawai‘i into the United States in 1959.

 

 

The collection contains Pierce’s surviving body of work—an estimated 50,000 photographic prints and negatives, the bulk of which are from the late 1950s through the early 1970s.  The collection’s significance lies in the years covered and the variety of subjects captured. As the archives processes the collection, what becomes evident is that during a historically important period of tremendous growth and change—those years around statehood—Pierce and his camera bore witness to nearly all forms of community activity conducted on Hawai’i Island.

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Lehua Kamalamalama and her Rosettes welcoming the SS Monterey on maiden voyage, Port of Hilo, October 1961. Modern day Theresa Sharon Moke Becktel and Sandra Moke Lee, pictured in the front, were identified through the Pierce Photo ID Project and pose next to their old photo. Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives.

It is this expansive and comprehensive view of Hawai‘i Island that makes the collection not only an invaluable contribution to the community’s story, but an invaluable contribution to the state’s historical record. They provide a view to the recent past, revealing a community ambitiously growing, changing, and constructing a new future; remembering and reclaiming its traditions; and savoring the simple pleasures of everyday life.

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Welcoming the USS Walker bearing gift of fifty-star flag, Port of Hilo, July 1958. Benny Kahaka (musician on far left) and Lovey Mae Akamu Scott (center) were identified through the Pierce Photo ID Project. Scott poses next to her photo along with Kahaka’s daughter, Barbara Lake. Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives.

Unfortunately, almost none of the photos in the collection have any information beyond date, if that.  The Photo ID Project is a multi-pronged strategy to recruit community help to solve these mysteries.  The recent Pierce Photograph Exhibit was a result of this project—over fifty identified photos were on display.

Unidentified photos have been shared with the public via Hawaii Tribune-Herald and the Kama‘aina Shopper, the Pierce photo exhibit, the Lyman Museum website, museum-hosted Photo ID Days and community outreach.  Of the almost 800 photos made available to the public, approximately 450 have been identified (at least partially).

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Paul Kodani poses next to his photo. Kodani was identified through the Pierce Photo ID Project as the boy paddling in a homemade canoe, Wailoa Estuary, late 1950s. Courtesy of Lyman Museum Archives.

Visit Lyman Museum on-line to see if you can identify some photos and to learn of additional Research Collections.  The Pierce photo exhibit will soon be available on-line!